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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, just looking for a little advice. I have a 2018 MKC Reserve 2.0 AWD just hit 20,000 Miles.
No issues yet, but all the Lincoln mkc posts about transmissions and engine replacements are concerning. Hoping maybe the 2018’s were built better? Thanks all!
 

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Things always look worse on a forum where people collectively go to one site to express their frustration when something breaks. It is most definitely a problem with the 2.0 EB though, and pretty sure there has been no fixes, I believe your 2018 will have the same designed engine.
If you’re really concerned about it, I know they usually sell you a Lincoln extended warranty once the factory one expires. May talk to Lincoln about that.
 
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They have a water jacket too close to the cylinder wall. The head gasket is used to seal the block from the head and due to the small wall between the cylinder and water jacket sometimes coolant gets past the gasket and this starts to “eat away” the block until there is a gap for at the top of the wall, and the coolant can more easily pass into the combustion cylinder
 

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Sounds like you still have powertrain warranty left. 6 year 70,000 miles from the day you bought it. (credit to other poster that reminded me of powertrain warranty) I would say at when you are a few months away from the warranty ending (2024?) Decide if you want to buy an Lincoln extended powertrain warranty or sell and find something different. I personally get board of driving the same car for more than 4-6 years. Some people own for as long as possible or until it's too costly to repair. In the end, it's your personal decision.
 
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I have a 2018 MKC Reserve 2.0 AWD. Sounds like we have almost the same car.

I bought mine at 20k, and since it was a "Lincoln Certified Preowned Vehicle" I got an extended power train out to 100k.
It now has nearly 60k on it, with ZERO problems. I drive it a LOT, and Love this car!
The AWD system is great in mountain snows. Nearly the equal of my Subaru Outback.

I have no idea how common this cylinder wall problem is, but mine hasn't had a hint of it.
It sounds like it would be very important to make sure the proper coolant is used.

Guess I thought the 2.3 L had more common problems...especially the 9 speed transmission, which I thankfully don't have.

Dave O.
 

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I spent some considerable time chasing this "coolant leaking into the cylinder" problem down this evening.

The folks at the Ford Escape forum have done a good deal of work on this...since they share this same 2.0L motor.
The problem is much more common with the 1.5 and 1.6L turbo motors btw. There's a 13 page long thread about this issue there.

The 2.0 L does have the problem sometimes as well...and it doesn't need to be a really high mileage car for this to occur. Some are failing with less than 50k miles. There is a "class action" lawsuit going on for the past few years against Ford also. Lately Ford seems more likely to replace the engines without much of a fuss. Perhaps they realized they had a design problem, and the lawsuit has them spooked.?.

One common thread seems to be that most of the motors with this failure issue came from the Cleveland Ford engine plant. Many of the 2.0L motors in US cars also came from the Valencia Spain engine plant. Those seem to seldom have this issue...at least according the the folks at the Escape forum...For reasons no one has explained. Ford/Lincoln switched from the Valencia engines to the Cleveland engines at some point, and many of the early Cleveland engines seemed to suffer this failure.

You can tell which motor you have by checking a white sticker up near the top of the motor, on the passenger side, near the motor mount there. It's kind of hidden by the big black plastic cover with the pretty Lincoln logo, but I was able to slip my cell phone down far enough to get a pic of it. The Valencia motors have the letters VEP (Valencia Engine Plant) on them. Mine happens to have a VEP engine...so I should be fairly safe.

Ford did make a change to how the coolant flows around the cylinders at some point in 2019, and that's supposed to fix the problem. New ones shouldn't fail in this way.

The other thing to watch closely is the coolant level. If you see it declining fairly rapidly, that's a sign of trouble on the way. The engine will also idle rough at cold start-up. It may throw a code, but sometimes they don't.

SO...If your coolant level is staying consistent, and you have a sticker that says VEP on it, (according to those posting at the Escape forum) you should have much less of a chance of an engine failure of this type with your 2.0L MKC.

So there ya go.

Dave O.
 

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My car is in for service P0303 ENgine PRoblem. There was no coolant when the code popped up when they checked when we brought it in for service. They think it leaked into the cylinder #3. I also get a rough start on startup. They will be inspected to see what the exact problem is. They have to open the engine to check. It's a 2019 MKC reserve 2.3 with around 37,000. I just bought it at the end of the lease a month earlier so I;m not happy.

So if it needs a new engine or a repair, what can I hope for going forward? I do not want to have a lemon after they complete their work.
 

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Alan...With only 37k on the clock, shouldn't it still be under warranty?
So, it sounds like the 2.3L motor can also share in the fun of all this.

They should be able to do a pressure test on the coolant system, and then (if it loses pressure over 5 hours or so) pull the plugs and look inside the cylinders with an endoscope.
That's the process Ford outlines in the TSB on this problem.

Dave O.
 

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I've got good news. It turns out it's only the gasket that needs to be replaced. They said all the measurements are right on for the engine block, all well within tolerances. So we'll pick up the car today. Thanks everyone for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I spent some considerable time chasing this "coolant leaking into the cylinder" problem down this evening.

The folks at the Ford Escape forum have done a good deal of work on this...since they share this same 2.0L motor.
The problem is much more common with the 1.5 and 1.6L turbo motors btw. There's a 13 page long thread about this issue there.

The 2.0 L does have the problem sometimes as well...and it doesn't need to be a really high mileage car for this to occur. Some are failing with less than 50k miles. There is a "class action" lawsuit going on for the past few years against Ford also. Lately Ford seems more likely to replace the engines without much of a fuss. Perhaps they realized they had a design problem, and the lawsuit has them spooked.?.

One common thread seems to be that most of the motors with this failure issue came from the Cleveland Ford engine plant. Many of the 2.0L motors in US cars also came from the Valencia Spain engine plant. Those seem to seldom have this issue...at least according the the folks at the Escape forum...For reasons no one has explained. Ford/Lincoln switched from the Valencia engines to the Cleveland engines at some point, and many of the early Cleveland engines seemed to suffer this failure.

You can tell which motor you have by checking a white sticker up near the top of the motor, on the passenger side, near the motor mount there. It's kind of hidden by the big black plastic cover with the pretty Lincoln logo, but I was able to slip my cell phone down far enough to get a pic of it. The Valencia motors have the letters VEP (Valencia Engine Plant) on them. Mine happens to have a VEP engine...so I should be fairly safe.

Ford did make a change to how the coolant flows around the cylinders at some point in 2019, and that's supposed to fix the problem. New ones shouldn't fail in this way.

The other thing to watch closely is the coolant level. If you see it declining fairly rapidly, that's a sign of trouble on the way. The engine will also idle rough at cold start-up. It may throw a code, but sometimes they don't.

SO...If your coolant level is staying consistent, and you have a sticker that says VEP on it, (according to those posting at the Escape forum) you should have much less of a chance of an engine failure of this type with your 2.0L MKC.

So there ya go.

Dave O.
Dave O. Ur awesome! Great Info 👍
 
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